How Exercise Fights Aging: 7 Benefits Of Exercise

how exercise fight aging

Slow the Aging Process Today

From improving bone strength to heart health, we all know that exercise can improve our quality of life but can it actually help slow the aging process? Our author breaks down 7 ways in which exercise can make you look and feel younger!

Want to slow the aging process?

Exercise is so valuable to people of all ages because it helps them to have stronger and leaner bodies.

When people exercise in conjunction with taking supplements and eating healthy meals, they often have the opportunity to live longer lives.

In fact, exercise in and of itself can help to slow the aging process. Keep in mind that some of these are physical and others are emotional or mental.

1. Cardiovascular Health

As you may already know from your own love for exercising, participating in exercise is good for the heart. By maintaining the health of the heart, individuals can counteract diseases that often plague people as they age.

Consulting with a doctor is important, however, since some exercises could prove dangerous for the heart in older people or those who have certain conditions.

2. Muscle Strength

Slow the aging process muscleAnother issue that comes with age is a general sense of weakness in the body. As you age, you may feel that you don’t have the strength to lift the same weight you used to.

However, in the event that you exercise, you can still have the strength that you used to when you were young.

In order to build muscle strength, you will also need to consume proper foods including protein. I recommend working out and then looking at supplements afterward.

If you are looking at supplements I would suggest checking out Progenex, or if you are looking to spend less money I recommend taking a look on Amazon.

3. Endurance and Stamina

Yet another sign of aging is that you don’t have the energy you used to. You may find yourself falling asleep earlier or getting tired easier when you are playing with your grandchildren.

People who are used to exercise, on the other hand, already have experience with pulling through when they are tired. Keeping up an exercise routine can help you to have a greater sense of endurance.

4. Feeling Younger

An important part of your physical health is how you feel, and if you have a mind for holistic health practices, then you probably already know that is true.

By engaging in exercise, you are channeling your strength, and you may feel as though you are connecting with a younger part of yourself. When you feel younger, you also have the ability to look younger.

5. Telomere Erosion

While you may feel younger when you workout, an actual physical reason exists for that. More reports are coming out that telomeres, which are sites at the end of your chromosomes, erode more slowly when you work out.

That means that you are actually aging more slowly from the inside.

Reading up on telomeres will show you that various studies have corroborated this fact.

6. Drinking More Water

Slow the aging process waterWhen you exercise, you need to stay hydrated. Whether you are new to the field of exercise or you have made exercise an important part of your routine, you know how important it is to have plenty of water when you work out.

Water can also help your skin look younger. While that is not exercised directly making you look younger, it is still working in an indirect manner to accomplish that goal.

7. Fighting Obesity

Another major problem that people experience when they age is that they pack on the pounds. This issue may lead you to become overweight or obese. If you add that extra weight onto issues that tend to plague older people, such as heart disease, you will see that you have a recipe for disaster.

When you workout, you are generally leaner, and that can have a tremendous effect on your health overall.

Wrap-Up

Getting in enough exercise is important for more than just one reason.

Now you know that exercise can slow the aging process and help you look and feel younger.

Ryan Blair
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